This guidance is designed to facilitate good thinking in relation to developing a robust and effective safeguarding culture. It is written as a thought piece, and offers a way of thinking that establishes your organisation’s approach. It will enable you to create your own, personalised checklist of actions to keep you and the young people you’re working with safe, and to manage risk well, as well as provide you with a set of suggested first 10 steps. It is not designed to tell you about the general aspects of establishing a youth group.

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Risk assessments should always be considered in the context of the potential benefits of the specific programme, location or activity for the young people participating.

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Effective safety management is normally delivered using a systems-based approach and an important component of this is monitoring and review

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Youth work organisations, as ‘employers’ are required by law to appoint a ‘competent’ person or people to help them meet their legal health and safety responsibilities. Further information regarding competence can be found on the HSE Website

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The aim of this guidance assists you to ensure your organisation effectively oversees the application of safeguarding.

This guidance is primarily for anyone in the voluntary sector but is applicable to anyone providing youth work services to children and young people. This could include but is not limited to a charity, community interest company, social enterprise or unincorporated charitable organisations.

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Youth work organisations should pay particular attention to the safety management of large scale events such as: large fundraising, sponsorship or sporting events; jamboree style events; recruitment or promotional fairs; religious festivals; other events involving large groups of people.

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It is essential that youth work organisations understand the individual support needs of all individuals participating in programmes or accessing services in advance, including young people and workers. Organisations should carefully review all information received from young people prior to a programme (i.e. application forms or similar), and pay particular note to any pre-existing conditions or accessibility requirements that have been disclosed.

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Supervision can be provided directly, indirectly (within clear boundaries) or remotely. Workers should always ensure that arrangements are appropriate for the needs and capabilities of the group and that associated risks have been taken into account.  

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About This Guidance This guidance promotes and supports a culture of fair and equal recruitment of staff or volunteers who have a criminal record, whilst ensuring the safe provision of services to children, young people and adults at risk. This guidance does not supersede the law and should be read alongside your Safer Recruitment Guidance … Continued

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Our organisation is committed to a culture of inclusivity and equality whilst ensuring the safe provision of services to children, young people and adults at risk. Having a criminal record does not automatically prevent you from working with or for our organisation. We recognise the contribution that all people can make as current or future workers, as both employees and volunteers, and are committed to a fair recruitment process in which no-one faces unfair discrimination due to a criminal record.

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COVID-19 Readiness Level

Readiness Level

G

What does this mean?

** From 27th January 2022 we can confirm that the youth sector moves to GREEN in the readiness framework**

(Version 10)

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