Youth Work Week provides an opportunity for youth organisations, youth workers and young people to celebrate their achievements and the impact of their work.

Youth Work Week will be held from 7-13 November 2016 – put a note in your calendar now!

To keep up to date with all things Youth Work Week in 2016, get on our mailing list. We’ll post more details soon.

 

This year’s theme – Fair chances: how youth work helps young people to brighter futures

This year’s theme focuses on how youth work can support young people to a better future.

Every young person should have the opportunities available to them to be the best they can be. But developing from child to adult is not easy and inequalities in income may also lead to inequality in outcome, through a lack of opportunities in education and employment for young people.

Of course youth work alone cannot tackle disadvantage. But the support of a skilled youth worker can help young people to learn about themselves and develop the confidence and self-esteem to navigate the right choices and put them on a trajectory to fulfill their potential.

 

How does youth work support young people’s futures?

Youth work can support young people’s life choices in many ways:

  • Education: Whilst at school, young people may need support around exam stress, friendships, mental health.
  • Out of school: Youth workers are someone to talk to when family and friends cannot help and can provide stability for young people when other aspects of their lives may be chaotic. They help young people bounce back from life’s inevitable knocks and so build resilience and other essential characteristics for life.
  • School to work transition: Young people need to know their options and require support to make decisions about their future. Youth work can help young people develop the skills to navigate the processes of recruitment and employment such as interviews , work experience and college/job applications. Youth work can help develop communication skills as well as the ability to present oneself in a positive way.
  • Youth work impact: youth work can help young people learn about one another, consider one another’s feelings, understand how to work together – develop skills which employers look for in new recruits to help young people get a job and prosper.
  • Social action is a key part of activity for young people. A social action community based project can help young people develop a whole range of essential skills, from financial know-how to team work. Youth work can help support young people to engage in social action who otherwise might not feel able to do so. Young people have brilliant ideas, the expertise of youth workers can help them to realise them. In the process of developing their projects young people are exposed to new experiences and new opportunities, which can help them move in a new trajectory they hadn’t previously considered, achieving new goals.

We hope youth work projects can use this theme in their celebrations of Youth Work Week. Don’t forget to email us your plans and tweet using #YWW16


What happened last year?

Last year Youth Work Week was held from 2-8 November 2015.

What did we do


YWW campaign